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FYI: I did submit the beginning of a story a while back; however, for some reason, it would only post here in/as "scraps."

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To conclude my Holi-daze silliness, a few amusing & bemusing facts re Christmas. Yes, I know it's ostensibly a Christian holiday & that not all of you are Christian, but now it's as much if not more a secular/commercial holiday, so it's effectively become everyone's celebration (at least in the Western World). Besides, it's the good cheer of the season that's really important, and that's the intention here...

First, briefly, in case you don't know:
Christmas happening when it does has "pagan" antecedents in ancient festivals connected with the winter solstice, like Saturnalia & the Kalends, but moreover with the Roman's very popular celebration of the birth of their adopted Persian sun god, Mithras (for which, to usurp & co-opt, the early Christian Church set the birthday of their "Son of God" to also be on December 25th).
Santa Claus is in part derived from a real person, St. Nikolas of Myra, a Greek from Turkey in the 200s-300s C.E. (A.D.) who was said to be a miracle worker that helped the poor & needy. Yet, curiously ironic, he was then early on portrayed as a stern, commanding symbol of discipline; to then, inexplicably, eventually became the adopted patron saint of everything from banking, to pawnbroking, pirating, butchery, sailing, thievery, orphans, royalty, and even New York City (!)...

It's got to be a Divine joke, the ultimate "ho ho ho": The modern commercialization of Christmas & the claimed patron saint of banking, pirating & thievery being also the patron of the city of Wall Street. This drolly absurd relationship connection perfectly evinced by the fact that in 2014 it is estimated Americans alone will spend almost $1-trillion on the "Christmas Season Holidays". Well, if nothing else, it keeps people employed, including yours truly...

The Viking god Odin is credited as one of the precursors to our modern Santa Claus beliefs & customs. In one version of his myth, Odin rides a flying horse with eight legs called Sleipnir, on which, in the winter, he'd come to bestow gifts on the good & impose punishments on the bad, so children would fill their boots or stockings with treats for his horse in the hope of disposing the god favorably. However, our modern idea & image of Santa as a rotund "jolly old soul" with a white beard who magically brought Christmas presents to children was not created by the Coca-Cola Company for their Xmas adverts. It originated with fanciful descriptions of the personality made by a group of early 19th Century American writers known as the New York Knickerbockers, which included a number of noted authors, like Washington Irving ("The Legend of Sleepy Hollow"). But the classic Santa long portrayed in the Coke ads did help to popularize this image to becoming the universal icon...

All letters addressed to "Santa Claus" in the United States supposedly go to Santa Claus, Indiana; unless "North Pole" is specified, then they go to North Pole, Alaska. There is an official postal unit in both of these places to process this mail & give a form reply. Evidently this got too big to handle well & so in 1996 northpole.com was started so kids (as well as parents & adults) could "communicate" with him via their computer or device. (It's okay. I know you're going to log on to it.)...

"Rudolph the Red Nose Reindeer" came to be as a 1939 Xmas promotion gimmick by the Montgomery Ward department store company, but like the majority of our modern popular secular Christmas songs – including "Winter Wonderland", "Let it Snow", "Chestnuts roasting on an open fire", "Silver Bells", "Santa Claus is Coming to Town", and "I'm Dreaming of a White Christmas" (claimed to be the best selling single in history with over 100-million copies sold) – all were written or composed by Jewish people. (Oy, vey!)...

Okay, enough silliness for this year. Pray all is well with everyone. May you all have wonderful Holidays whatever you believe in & celebrate, and my earnest hope this coming New Year will be your best one yet...

In closing, remember, if you want to ensure yourself a jolly Xmas, keep in mind the real reason Santa is so jolly: He knows where all the "naughty" girls & boys live... ;)

Have fun. Be safe. More next year...

:heart: :heart:
 

 

To continue with my Holi-daze silliness, here are some fun American Thanksgiving Day tidbits.

 

I should note here first that the Canadians also have a Thanksgiving Day, the only other country to officially have such a day. They celebrate theirs in October & it has a different history. Also, although both of these holidays occurring in the autumn season can be said to connect them with ancient festivities concerning the harvest, the main focus of both of these have to do with the Christin concept of "giving thanks" to the Divine for good fortune.

 

Why American Thanksgiving is also called "Turkey Day" and shouldn't be (unless they remake it a holiday to give politicians their due):

 

Briefly, for those of you that may not know, the U.S. Thanksgiving is, ostensibly, in commemoration of the autumn 1621 feast the "Pilgrim" sect of English Puritan Christian settlers held in Massachusetts to "thank God" for surviving their first year there. (In truth, it was largely the kindness of the Native Americans that made their survival possible, unfortunately.) Anyway, what does this have to do with turkeys? Well, no one's quite sure how, but the turkey bird got associated with their feast, and so when celebrating it developed into a national practice in the 19th Century as a "day for all citizens to give thanks for their blessings" (it wasn't made an official national holiday until 1941) the turkey become the traditional bird Americans served for the occasion's dinner. However, as far as can be determined, turkey was not served at the Pilgrims original feast. All that's mentioned in the few after the event made records is: venison, sea food, game birds (but not turkeys), porridge, and assorted fruits & vegetables (but no cranberries or pumpkins).

 

How did these birds come to be called turkeys? Prior to Columbus' famous voyage (or infamous voyage, depending on your view) Europeans had become fond of a kind of guinea fowl imported by Turkish merchants from what was then the Ottoman Empire. Hence, the English called these birds "turkeys." When the indigenous American bird was first discovered & eaten, it was found to taste like the Turkish bird, and so the English also called them "turkeys."

 

Ben Franklin wanted the turkey to be America's national emblem bird, not the eagle. "The eagle has a bad moral character," he said. "The turkey is a much more respectable bird." (I've often wondered if this wasn't really an example of Ben's tongue in cheek wit.)

 

The invention of the "TV Dinner" in 1953 is due to the Swanson food company finding itself with a 26-ton surplus of fresh turkeys after Thanksgiving. Rather than waste all that meat, they decided to capitalize on television & packaged frozen foods being the big new "high-tech" inventions at the time, and, voila!

 

Because the white (breast) meat of the turkey is the most popular, the natural wild turkey has been cultivated & bred to have abnormally large breasts, to the point that they're now so big they prevent male turkeys from being able to mount the females to breed. Hence, all the domesticated turkeys you buy at the market today are the result of artificial insemination.

 

The now world famous Macy's department store huge Thanksgiving Day Parade (originally called "Macy's Christmas Parade") began in 1924 as a small affair by Macy's employees for kids to promote Christmas gift sales. There were no big marching bands, spectacular floats, or the like, just a few animals from the New York City zoo & a Santa. Today, some 4-million people attend & participate, and over 100-million worldwide are estimated to watch it via TV.

 

Connecting Thanksgiving with Xmas to promote gift sales (and so stores' profits) is also the origin of the wild "sales" shopping day following Thanksgivings' happening on Thursdays called "Black Friday" (and now its Net Age offshoot, "Cyber Monday"). The old accounting term for debts was "red ink" & for profits "black ink," as these were the colors of ink used to indicate which in ledgers. The purpose & so connection in this case was/is to ensure stores' yearly total sales profits being "in the black" before the end of the year by starting the official Holiday Shopping Season off with an orgy of shopping. Maybe this is why Thomas Jefferson thought the concept of Thanksgiving was "the most ridiculous idea I’ve ever heard."

 

And with that, gobble, gobble.  Ho ho ho is next...

 

:heart:

Okay, since people have wondered why I've not posted some of my writing here, the reason is, my work mostly involves arcane historical & philosophical subjects that I felt would not be of that much interest to most readers on this site. But, here's an example for you. The beginning of an essay I've been working on concerning the subject of "Atlantis". Hope you find it interesting...

Copyright © 2014
George T. Young

“ATLANTIS” ?

FOREWORD

Simply, this little essay is some wonderings, if you will, resulting from an informal but earnest attempt to look at things re “Atlantis” that are– as they are.

Okay, and just what do I think these are? Well, as far as I can see, after discounting all the fiction and nonsense written about this subject, it boils down to three valid groups of factors:

1. The source material, of course, which is a mixed bag of still extant ancient writings by various (predominantly Classical era) chroniclers and scholars; most famously, Plato.

2. An equally mixed bag of (often-contentious) modern scientific theorizing about the question these ancient writings (foremost Plato’s) have generated.

3. Significant evidence of early civilization(s) in the areas called or associated with "Atlantis" and/or "Atlantians" in these ancient writings.

[Because the extant ancient records re this place/peoples refer to them by various spellings of the Atlantic name (as well as by other connectable names) let me note here first that I will be using Plato’s (translated) terms "Atlantis"/"Atlantians" for this place/peoples as a collective generic throughout in my general discussion here. They have become the universal understood names/terms now used and so the most sensible to utilize for the sake of readability. For this reason is why they are in quotation marks, to distinguish that I’m referring to or considering only the Atlantis/Atlantians as meant in all the ancient accounts (in addition to Plato’s) and not the Atlantis/Atlantians of popular modern writings and imagination.]

Briefly re the above:

1.) Although these places/peoples are called by various names in the source material, depending on author/origin (most variations of the “Atlantic” appellation being Classical sources), it is nonetheless singularly curious they all effectively agree in that they describe and expound on essentially the same places, peoples, and events (excepting for Plato’s cataclysm, the issues with which will be discussed in due course). In all these writings (including Plato’s) “Atlantis”/”Atlantians” are foremost if not solely located to or associated with the Western Mediterranean, particularly the areas of Northwest Africa and the Iberian Peninsula, including Atlantic and Mediterranean islands situated (primarily) in the region of Gibraltar. Moreover (excluding the “issues” re Plato’s histrionics), nothing fantastic or incredible is said of or about these places or peoples. Indeed, they are essentially portrayed as what we would call high Neolithic and/or Aeneolithic cultures, i.e., having agriculture, metallurgy, towns, commerce, megalithic architecture, etc. (Sorry, no mention of anything like “power crystals” or levitation machines.) This gives the extant ancient records re “Atlantis”/”Atlantians” both sense and believability as it puts the earliest time for this place/peoples existence at around 7,000+ years ago. Selected examples of these writings statements vis-à-vis Plato’s will be discussed in the Source Material section.

2.) Although there still has been too little objectively serious scientific research re the  “Atlantis” question, sincere and genuine investigation has nonetheless been done, especially in recent years. Yet, despite the significant new (different) observations and findings in this regard this research has yielded, most of it has gotten stuck focusing on just trying to explain Plato’s story only; most concluding that learning of the Minoans and their demise due to the volcanic catastrophe at Thera/Santorini inspired his fabulously described civilization destroyed by cataclysm. The “attractiveness” of this theory is both understandable and logical, but the problems with it – firstly, that Crete is in the Eastern Mediterranean – are usually glossed over. This matter will likewise be discussed in the Source Material section.

3.) The most evident evidence for prehistoric civilizations in the areas/places connected with “Atlantis”/”Atlantians” by the ancient writers are the monumental Megalithic complexes that exist there; from the British Isles down through France, Spain and into Northwest Africa, and on area located islands like the Canaries, the Balearics, and east as far as Malta. The most famous of these, of course, is Stonehenge (which dates from c. 5,000 years ago), but there are many such sites of similar architecture/construction in these areas/places; some believed to be even older. Significant other examples include sites at Cadiz and Seville, ruins in Morocco, and the enigmatic complex (curiously including a step-pyramid) on the Canaries’ Tenerife Island. Although these sites are not unknown, they have yet to be properly investigated. The celebrated explorer/ archaeologist, the late Thor Heyerdahl, initiated an effort re the Tenerife site, but, predictably, it seems to have generated little traction. The matters/relationships re these sites to our question here will likewise be elaborated on in due course.


RE THE SOURCE MATERIAL

Since the source material re “Atlantis”/”Atlantians” is today (often superciliously) regarded as mere “myths” or “legends” or, at best, as spurious second-hand accounts; and, as the majority of what we have in this regard is of Classical era authorship, indulge me to begin here with these comments.

Regardless of what may be popularly believed (even by educated people) about myth in general (but particularly here re Classical myth, and specifically as it concerns  “Atlantis”/”Atlantians”), these narrations may not necessarily be “factual” in the scientific sense, but they are not the creations of primitive minds or fictions of imagination. Simply, they are largely reporting on what is essentially politico-religious history, based on memoria (“mindful and cared for remembrances”) that had been or were compiled into historia (“learned knowledge about and witful inquiry into the tales and stories of a peo¬ple”). These are often presented in a symbol/symbolic or “mythologized” way in epical form, a common methodology of relating/teaching history in ancient times (e.g., Homer). Seeing them as only “chimerical fancies” is to misinterpret/misunderstand them; thus to trivialize them and so miss seeing their underlying truth, the “esoteric” information they contain if you will. Indeed, Homer’s epics are perhaps the most famous examples of such misjudgment; until Troy was discovered, they were generally regarded as being essentially fabulous.  

As the foremost scholar in this field, the late Robert Graves (his, The Greek Myths, is still regarded as the definitive work on this subject), so aptly expounded re this problem: “A true science of myth should begin with a study of archaeology, history, and comparative religion, not in the psycho-therapist’s consulting-room. Though the Jungians hold that ‘myths are original revelations of the pre-conscious psyche, involuntary statements about unconscious psychic happenings’, Greek mythology was no more mysterious in content than are modern election cartoons, and for the most part formulated in territories which maintained close political relations with Minoan Crete…”

(The Minoan connection is significant re our question here, and will be further discussed below.)

Re Plato

The most famous – some might say infamous – ancient reference to a place/people called “Atlantis”/”Atlantians” is, of course, Plato’s; however, there are actually many ancient writings and references concerning peoples/lands/islands in the area of Gibraltar, many dating from before Plato’s time. But since his story factors so importantly in the question of “Atlantis,” it of necessity will concern the major part of the discussion re the source material here.

Inopportunely for earnest research into this question, Plato’s eminence as one of history’s greatest minds has resulted in the general opinion being his is the only ancient record concerning such a place/people; and, largely due to its “fabulousness,” its veracity being regarded dubious at best. Moreover, it is ironically unfortunate that Plato ever wrote about “Atlantis” re why/how he wrote about it, for this has inordinately turned debate of the question into a silly Believers vs. Debunkers game. This has been at the center of the real “problem of ‘Atlantis’” and has resulted in the “proving”/”disproving” of it (Plato’s story alone as written) having become the focus of the question. Thus, there has been a missing of “connections” to the other pieces of the puzzle that, self-evidently to me, would more fully answer the question of this matter.

Unlike the other ancient accounts dealing with “Atlantis”/”Atlantians,” Plato’s is really (was intended to be) an allegory– not a reporting of history per se. This is not to say he invented what he said or that he was being mendacious; rather that he took a bit of literary license with actual historical knowledge for composing what was apparently to be a philosophical parable in epical form. The historicity was subordinate to the moral he wished to impart, to educe.

It seems he was inspired to write his story while visiting at the court of the then tyrant king of Syracuse; supposedly intended to be a work he was going to enter in a poetry contest this ruler is said to have sponsored during Plato’s sojourn there. Evidently, Plato saw this as a clever way to espouse his ideals to this autocrat, and what better way than by using the drama of the archetypal cataclysm as metaphor to ode what happens to a civilization when it becomes corrupt and looses its “divine nature.” In any case, the king reportedly died before the event was to happen and so Plato apparently never finished the work.

Be all this as it may, what has survived is contained in (oddly included split between) his two otherwise essentially conceptual discussions known today as the Timaeus and Critias. It is believed the title was originally intended to be, Atlantikos, i.e., (about) the Atlantic.

The first part is rather brief and essentially, straightforward, being a synopsis reiteration of an account attributed to Solon, the most venerated statesman of Athenian history then. Except for a few “issues” (most significant the age dates given, which we’ll get into momentarily) there is nothing said in this part of his story that is honestly unbelievable or impossible. The rather disjointedly connected second part (reintroduced as a continuation of the retelling of Solon’s record following a lengthy metaphysical digression) is longer and far more fanciful if not incredible in some of its descriptions re the scale of the “Atlantians” culture and feats. (Plausibly, this commentary is the part of his planned romanticizing of them for his intended poem.)

To review concisely: The story as we have it now is presented as being introduced by one of Plato’s company of students (Critias) at a symposium, seemingly as an expedient way of to validate the principles of his teacher’s Republic by giving a “veritable” example of what happens to a civilization when it forsakes “right ideals.” Critias is said to be of the family of Solon, and he testifies Solon learned of this history in Egypt; the record he made of it being preserved by his descendents, to thus be learned by him. Curiously, Critias also says Solon had planned to turn this dictation into an epic poem but died before he could do so. (Dare it be suggested that our dear Plato, at least in part, was going to plagiarized Solon’s accounting for his poem?)

This aspect could well be a literary contrivance in part. Not that it’s untrue, rather that his telling of it like this being a convenient way for Plato to add the prestige of Solon’s name to his intended ode to give it authority, since Solon was far more known and esteemed then than Plato. Regardless, there is no good reason to doubt or dismiss out of hand the source being Egyptian or its essential veracity. Solon did visit Egypt, but so also did Plato (as most Classical era scholars did, being it was the premier place where most of the knowledge then was available to them) and so, he could just as easily have learned about this there himself. Whatever, how/why his story ended up being how we have it now is unclear. It is possible it was done by his students in compiling his writings after his death (feeling it too important to not somehow incorporate) and/or the result of some kind of mix-up by later transcribers.

In any case, that a man of Plato’s means and erudition could have acquired much of the basis for his intended epic from actual historical records that then would have been available to him (from Egypt and elsewhere) would seem doubtless, and so it appears he did. That most of the sources (re this question and so much more) he and the other ancient writers would have had accessible then have been lost, largely due to human madness (e.g., the destruction of the Alexandrian Library) is, truly, one of history’s great tragedies. However, this does not ipso facto make the information they recite gleaned from them de facto untrue or justifiably invalid.

The first part of his story begins as a reporting of an Egyptian account re peoples who lived in the area of Gibraltar and events related to them, occurring in what then would have been regarded prehistoric times to the Greeks (even discounting the improbable age dates given by Plato, which are uniquely singular to his story; for probable reasons to be enumerated on). In most other aspects, this first part is in essential agreement with what is said in the other ancient “Atlantis” related accounts.

It is this, along with the evidence of the ruins/sites in these Atlantic associated areas, that to me seems to preclude any peoples/places/events in the Eastern Mediterranean, like the Minoans/Crete/Thera, being called or thought “Atlantis”/”Atlantians” by any of the authors of the ancient records in this regard.

> > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > More as it happens... :heart:
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Title: "Atlantis" ?
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Since the Holi-daze are upon us, enough gloom & doom. So I thought I'd start them off with a little silliness. Here's a few for real newspaper headlines I gleaned I trust you'll find amusing:

 

"Weiner's Rise & Fall" (New York Post)

 

"Study Shows Frequent Sex Enhances Pregnancy Chances" (The Winchester Star, Virginia)

 

"Missippi's literacy program shows improvement" (Associated Press)

 

"Bugs flying around with wings are flying bugs" (Redwood County Extension, Minnesota)

 

"Tiger Plays With Own Balls, Nike Says" (Associated Press)

 

"Marijuana issue sent to a joint committee" (Toronto Star)

 

"Homicide victims rarely talk to police" (The Express-Times, Pennsylvania)

 

"Utah Poison Control Center reminds everyone not to take poison" (Salt Lake Tribune)

 

"Best Man left bleeding after being hit by flying dildo" (NT News, Australia)

 

"Young Tight Ends Excite Coaches" (Atlanta Journal‑Constitution, Georgia)

 

"Big rig carrying fruit crashes on 210 Freeway, creates jam" (Los Angeles Times)

 

"Psychics predict world didn't end yesterday" (Treasure Coast Tribune, Florida)

 

"Federal Agents Raid Gun Shop, Find Weapons" (Tulsa World, Oklahoma)

 

Okay, more soon. Have fun, be safe...

 

:heart:

 

Being an American, some of you have asked my opinion of our recent elections. Well, rather than me trying to pontificate, I'll let some more astute people than me express my sentiments. I should add these thoughts equally apply to the European & the World's other democracies-cum-capitalist systems as they are currently. The only thing "good" about this is that all the other systems are worse:

"Democracy is a form of government that substitutes election by the incompetent many for appointment by the corrupt few."
– George Bernard Shaw

"The best argument against democracy is a five-minute conversation with the average voter."
–Winston Churchill

 "Democracy is the pathetic belief in the collective wisdom of individual ignorance."
– H.L. Mencken

 "In our political system, money is power. And that means a few can have a lot more power than the rest. That's bad news for everyone else— and for our democracy... Capitalism is against the things that we say we believe in— democracy, freedom of choice, fairness. It's not about any of those things now. It's about protecting the wealthy and legalizing greed."
– Michael Moore  

 "Our form of democracy is bribery, on the highest scale."
– Gore Vidal

 "Propaganda is to a democracy what the bludgeon is to a totalitarian state."
– Noam Chomsky

"Advocates of capitalism are very apt to appeal to the sacred principles of liberty, which are embodied in one maxim: The fortunate must not be restrained in the exercise of tyranny over the unfortunate."
- Bertrand Russell

"Capitalism is the extraordinary belief that the nastiest of men for the nastiest of motives will somehow work for the benefit of all."
- John Maynard Keynes

"Capitalism is the legitimate racket of the ruling class."
- Al Capone

"Capitalism is essentially a condition in which public officials are giving favors to people in the private sector in payment of political favors."
- Alan Greenspan 

“Capitalism tries for a delicate balance: It attempts to work things out so that everyone gets just enough stuff to keep them from getting violent and trying to take other people’s stuff.”
- George Carlin

 "Remember, democracy never lasts long. It soon wastes, exhausts, and murders itself. There has never been a democracy that did not commit suicide."
– John Adams

"Dictatorship naturally arises out of democracy. And the most aggravated form of tyranny and slavery out of the most extreme liberty."
– Plato

“One of the saddest lessons of history is this: If we’ve been bamboozled long enough, we tend to reject any evidence of the bamboozle. We’re no longer interested in finding out the truth. The bamboozle has captured us. It’s simply too painful to acknowledge, even to ourselves, that we’ve been taken. Once you give a charlatan power over you, you almost never get it back.”
– Carl Sagan

 Have a nice day...

:heart:

To conclude my Holi-daze silliness, a few amusing & bemusing facts re Christmas. Yes, I know it's ostensibly a Christian holiday & that not all of you are Christian, but now it's as much if not more a secular/commercial holiday, so it's effectively become everyone's celebration (at least in the Western World). Besides, it's the good cheer of the season that's really important, and that's the intention here...

First, briefly, in case you don't know:
Christmas happening when it does has "pagan" antecedents in ancient festivals connected with the winter solstice, like Saturnalia & the Kalends, but moreover with the Roman's very popular celebration of the birth of their adopted Persian sun god, Mithras (for which, to usurp & co-opt, the early Christian Church set the birthday of their "Son of God" to also be on December 25th).
Santa Claus is in part derived from a real person, St. Nikolas of Myra, a Greek from Turkey in the 200s-300s C.E. (A.D.) who was said to be a miracle worker that helped the poor & needy. Yet, curiously ironic, he was then early on portrayed as a stern, commanding symbol of discipline; to then, inexplicably, eventually became the adopted patron saint of everything from banking, to pawnbroking, pirating, butchery, sailing, thievery, orphans, royalty, and even New York City (!)...

It's got to be a Divine joke, the ultimate "ho ho ho": The modern commercialization of Christmas & the claimed patron saint of banking, pirating & thievery being also the patron of the city of Wall Street. This drolly absurd relationship connection perfectly evinced by the fact that in 2014 it is estimated Americans alone will spend almost $1-trillion on the "Christmas Season Holidays". Well, if nothing else, it keeps people employed, including yours truly...

The Viking god Odin is credited as one of the precursors to our modern Santa Claus beliefs & customs. In one version of his myth, Odin rides a flying horse with eight legs called Sleipnir, on which, in the winter, he'd come to bestow gifts on the good & impose punishments on the bad, so children would fill their boots or stockings with treats for his horse in the hope of disposing the god favorably. However, our modern idea & image of Santa as a rotund "jolly old soul" with a white beard who magically brought Christmas presents to children was not created by the Coca-Cola Company for their Xmas adverts. It originated with fanciful descriptions of the personality made by a group of early 19th Century American writers known as the New York Knickerbockers, which included a number of noted authors, like Washington Irving ("The Legend of Sleepy Hollow"). But the classic Santa long portrayed in the Coke ads did help to popularize this image to becoming the universal icon...

All letters addressed to "Santa Claus" in the United States supposedly go to Santa Claus, Indiana; unless "North Pole" is specified, then they go to North Pole, Alaska. There is an official postal unit in both of these places to process this mail & give a form reply. Evidently this got too big to handle well & so in 1996 northpole.com was started so kids (as well as parents & adults) could "communicate" with him via their computer or device. (It's okay. I know you're going to log on to it.)...

"Rudolph the Red Nose Reindeer" came to be as a 1939 Xmas promotion gimmick by the Montgomery Ward department store company, but like the majority of our modern popular secular Christmas songs – including "Winter Wonderland", "Let it Snow", "Chestnuts roasting on an open fire", "Silver Bells", "Santa Claus is Coming to Town", and "I'm Dreaming of a White Christmas" (claimed to be the best selling single in history with over 100-million copies sold) – all were written or composed by Jewish people. (Oy, vey!)...

Okay, enough silliness for this year. Pray all is well with everyone. May you all have wonderful Holidays whatever you believe in & celebrate, and my earnest hope this coming New Year will be your best one yet...

In closing, remember, if you want to ensure yourself a jolly Xmas, keep in mind the real reason Santa is so jolly: He knows where all the "naughty" girls & boys live... ;)

Have fun. Be safe. More next year...

:heart: :heart:
 

deviantID

gymnosophist
George
Artist | Professional | Literature
United States
Current Residence: San Francisco, CA USA
deviantWEAR sizing preference: Not really...
Print preference: As available...
Favourite genre of music: Classical & Hard Rock
Favourite photographer: Several...
Favourite style of art: Most...
Operating System: My brain (when it works); my psyche (always)...
MP3 player of choice: Don't have any players of any kind ...
Shell of choice: 1-room apt. (not my ideal choice, but it's cheap & serves the purpose)...
Wallpaper of choice: No wallpaper; white walls...
Skin of choice: Alas, it's getting old & wrinkled (inexorably by Nature, not my choice)...
Favourite cartoon character: "Lio," "Holy Mole," "Pearls Before Swine," ""Non Sequitur," among others...
Personal Quote: Do good, have fun, be of good cheer...
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Thanks for the fave of Xmas panty!
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:D :hug: :heart:  You're dearly welcome...
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Thanks for the watch~
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:D :hug:  You're dearly welcome...
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Thank you so much for the watch :hug:
Have one back :D 
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Thank you for watching!!
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:D:D You're dearly welcome. My pleasure... :heart:
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<3
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